Brand building through storytelling

The Fan Club

I was 14 years old and in the ninth grade when I wrote this short story, inspired by bullying I’d witnessed at school. My only goal was to enter the story in a contest and win a prize. I did, garnering my first byline. Since then, the story has appeared in countless textbooks and still brings me messages from students who recognize themselves in my characters. You can read some typical comments here, although this site is closed to new comments. If you’d like to distribute the story or share a thought about it, I’d love to hear from you: rona@ronamaynard.com.



It was Monday again. It was Monday and the day was damp and cold. Rain splattered the cover of Algebra I as Laura heaved her books higher on her arm and sighed. School was such a bore.

School. It loomed before her now, massive and dark against the sky. In a few minutes, she would have to face them again—Diane Goddard with her sleek blond hair and Terri Pierce in her candy-pink sweater. And Carol and Steve and Bill and Nancy… There were so many of them, so exclusive as they stood in their tight little groups laughing and joking. Why were they so cold and unkind? Was it because her long stringy hair hung in her eyes instead of dipping in graceful curls? Was it because she wrote poetry in algebra class and got A’s in Latin without really trying?

Shivering, Laura remembered how they would sit at the back of English class, passing notes and whispering. She thought of their identical brown loafers, their plastic purses, their hostile stares as they passed her in the corridors. She didn’t care. They were clods, the whole lot of them. She shoved her way through the door and there they were. They thronged the hall,streamed in and out of doors, clustered under red and yellow posters advertising the latest dance. Mohair sweaters, madras shirts, pea-green raincoats. They were all alike, all the same. And in the center of the group, as usual, Diane Goddard was saying, “It’ll be a riot! I just can’t wait to see her face when she finds out.”

Laura flushed painfully. Were they talking about her?

“What a scream! Can’t wait to hear what she says!” Silently she hurried past and submerged herself in the stream of students heading for the lockers. It was then that she saw Rachel Horton—alone as always, her too-long skirt billowing over the white, heavy columns of her legs, her freckled face ringed withover the white, heavy columns of her legs, her freckled face ringed with shapeless black curls. She called herself Horton, but everyone knew her father was Jacob Hortensky, the tailor. He ran that greasy little shop where you could always smell the cooked cabbage from the back rooms where the family lived.

“Oh, Laura!” Rachel was calling her. Laura turned, startled.

“Hi, Rachel.”

“Laura, did you watch World of Nature last night? On Channel 11?”

“No-no, I didn’t.” Laura hesitated. “I almost never watch that kind of program.”

“Well, gee, you missed something-last night, I mean. It was a real good show. Laura, it showed this fly being born!” Rachel was smiling now; she waved her hands as she talked.

“First the feelers and then the wings. And they’re sort of wet at first, the wings are. Gosh, it was a good show.”

“I bet it was.” Laura tried to sound interested. She turned to go, but Rachel still stood there, her mouth half open, her pale, moon-like face strangely urgent. It was as if an invisible hand tugged at Laura’s sleeve.

“And Laura,” Rachel continued, “that was an awful good poem you read yesterday in English.” Laura remembered how Terri and Diane had laughed and whispered. “You really think so? Well, thanks, Rachel. I mean, not too many people care about poetry.”

“Yours was real nice though. I wish I could write like you. I always like those things you write.”

Laura blushed. “I’m glad you do.”

“Laura, can you come over sometime after school? Tomorrow maybe? It’s not very far and you can stay for dinner. I told my parents all about you!”

Laura thought of the narrow, dirty street and the tattered awning in front of the tailor shop. An awful district, the kids said. But she couldn’t let that matter. “Okay,” she said. And then, faking enthusiasm, “I’d be glad to come.”

She turned into the algebra room, sniffing at the smell of chalk and dusty erasers. In the back row, she saw the “in” group, laughing and joking and whispering.

“What a panic!”

“Here, you make the first one.”

Diane and Terri had their heads together over a lot of little cards. You could see they were cooking up something.

Fumbling through the pages of her book, she tried to memorize the theorems she hadn’t looked at the night before. The laughter at the back of the room rang in her ears. Also those smiles-those heartless smiles. . . . A bell buzzed in the corridors; students scrambled to their places. “We will now have the national anthem,” said the voice on the loudspeaker. Laura shifted her weight from one foot to the other. It was so false, so pointless. How could they sing of the land of the free, when there was still discrimination. Smothered laughter behind her. Were they all looking at her?

And then it was over. Slumping in her seat, she shuffled through last week’s half-finished homework papers and scribbled flowers in the margins. “Now this one is just a direct application of the equation.” The voice was hollow, distant, an echo beyond the sound of rustling papers and hushed whispers. Laura sketched a guitar on the cover of her notebook. Someday she would live in the Village and there would be no more algebra classes and people would accept her.

She turned towards the back row. Diane was passing around one of her cards. Terri leaned over, smiling. “Hey, can I do the next one?” “. . . by using the distributive law.” Would the class never end? Math was so dull, so painfully dull. They made you multiply and cancel and factor, multiply, cancel, and factor. Just like a machine. The steel sound of the bell shattered the silence. Scraping chairs, cries of “Hey, wait!” The crowd moved into the hallway now, a thronging, jostling mass.

Alone in the tide of faces, Laura felt someone nudge her. It was Ellen. “Hey, how’s that for a smart outfit?” She pointed to the other side of the hall.

The gaudy flowers of Rachel Horton’s blouse stood out among the fluffy sweaters and pleated skirts. What a lumpish, awkward creature Rachel was. Did she have to dress like that? Her socks had fallen untidily around her heavy ankles, and her slip showed a raggedy edge of lace. As she moved into the English room, shoelaces trailing, her books tumbled to the floor.

“Isn’t that something?” Terri said. Little waves of mocking laughter swept through the crowd.

The bell rang; the laughter died away. As they hurried to their seats, Diane and Terri exchanged last-minute whispers. “Make one for Steve. He wants one too!” Then Miss Merrill pushed aside the book she was holding, folded her hands, and beamed. “All right, people, that will be enough. Now, today we have our speeches. Laura, would you begin please?”

So it was her turn. Her throat tightened as she thought of Diane and Carol and Steve grinning and waiting for her to stumble. Perhaps if she was careful they’d never know she hadn’t thought out everything beforehand. Careful, careful, she thought. Look confident.

“Let’s try to be prompt.” Miss Merrill tapped the cover of her book with her fountain pen. Laura pushed her way to the front of the class. Before her, the room was large and still. Twenty-five round, blurred faces stared blankly. Was that Diane’s laughter? She folded her hands and looked at the wall, strangely distant now, its brown paint cracked and peeling. A dusty portrait of Robert Frost, a card with the seven rules for better paragraphs, last year’s calendar, and the steady, hollow ticking of the clock. Laura cleared her throat. “Well,” she began, “my speech is on civil rights.” A chorus of snickers rose from the back of the room.

“Most people,” Laura continued, “most people don’t care enough about others. Here in New England, they think they’re pretty far removed from discrimination and violence. Lots of people sit back and fold their hands and wait for somebody else to do the work. But I think we’re all responsible for people that haven’t had some of the advantages. . . .”

Diane was giggling and gesturing at Steve Becker. All she ever thought about was parties and dates-and such dates! Always the president of the student council or the captain of the football team.

“A lot of people think that race prejudice is limited to the South. But most of us are prejudiced-whether we know it or not. It’s not just that we don’t give other people a chance; we don’t give ourselves a chance either. We form narrow opinions and then we don’t see the truth. We keep right on believing that we’re open-minded liberals when all we’re doing is deceiving ourselves.”

How many of them cared about truth? Laura looked past the rows of blank, empty faces, past the bored stares and cynical grins.

“But I think we should try to forget our prejudices. We must realize now that we’ve done too little for too long. We must accept the fact that one person’s misfortune is everyone’s responsibility. We must defend the natural dignity of people-a dignity that thousands are denied.”

None of them knew what it was like to be unwanted, unaccepted. Did Steve know? Did Diane?

“Most of us are proud to say that we live in a free country. But is this really true? Can we call the United States a free country when millions of people face prejudice and discrimination? As long as one person is forbidden to share the basic rights we take for granted, as long as we are still the victims of irrational hatreds, there can be no freedom. Only when every American learns to respect the dignity of every other American can we truly call our country free.”

The class was silent. “Very nice, Laura.” Things remained quiet as other students droned through their speeches. Then Miss Merrill looked briskly around the room. “Now, Rachel, I believe you’re next.”

There was a ripple of dry, humorless laughter—almost, Laura thought, like the sound of a rattlesnake. Rachel stood before the class now, her face red, her heavy arms piled with boxes.

Diane Goddard tossed back her head and winked at Steve.

“Well, well, don’t we have lots of things to show,” said Miss Merrill. “But aren’t you going to put those boxes down, Rachel? No, no, not there!”

“Man, that kid’s dumb,” Steve muttered, and his voice could be clearly heard all through the room.

With a brisk rattle, Miss Merrill’s pen tapped the desk for silence.

Rachel’s slow smile twitched at the corners. She looked frightened. There was a crash and a clatter as the tower of boxes slid to the floor. Now everyone was giggling.

“Hurry and pick them up,” said Miss Merrill sharply.

Rachel crouched on her knees and began very clumsily to gather her scattered treasures. Papers and boxes lay all about, and some of the boxes had broken open, spilling their contents in wild confusion. No one went to help. At last she scrambled to her feet and began fumbling with her notes.

“My—my speech is on shells.”

A cold and stony silence had settled upon the room.

“Lots of people collect shells, because they’re kind of pretty-sort of, and you just find them on the beach.” “Well, whaddaya know!” It was Steve’s voice, softer this time, but all mock amazement. Laura jabbed her notebook with her pencil. Why were they so cruel, so thoughtless? Why did they have to laugh?

“This one,” Rachel was saying as she opened one of the boxes, “it’s one of the best.” Off came the layers of paper and there, at last, smooth and pearly and shimmering, was the shell. Rachel turned it over lovingly in her hands. White, fluted sides, like the closecurled petals of a flower; a scrolled coral back. Laura held her breath. It was beautiful. At the back of the room snickers had begun again.

“Bet she got it at Woolworth’s,” somebody whispered.

“Or in a trash dump.” That was Diane.

Rachel pretended not to hear, but her face was getting very red and Laura could see she was flustered.

“Here’s another that’s kind of pretty. I found it last summer at Ogunquit.” In her outstretched hand there was a small, drab, brownish object. A common snail shell. “It’s called a . . . It’s called. . . .”

Rachel rustled through her notes. “I—I can’t find it. But it was here. It was in here somewhere. I know it was.” Her broad face had turned bright pink again. “Just can’t find it. . . .” Miss Merrill stood up and strode toward her. “Rachel,” she said sharply, “we are supposed to be prepared when we make a speech. Now, I’m sure you remember those rules on page twenty-one. I expect you to know these things. Next time you must have your material organized.”

The bell sounded, ending the period. Miss Merrill collected her books. Then, suddenly, chairs were shoved aside at the back of the room and there was the sound of many voices whispering. They were standing now, whole rows of them, their faces grinning with delight. Choked giggles, shuffling feet—and then applause—wild, sarcastic, malicious applause. That was when Laura saw that they were all wearing little white cards with a fat, frizzy-haired figure drawn on the front. What did it mean? She looked more closely.

“HORTENSKY FAN CLUB,” said the bright-red letters.

So that was what the whispering had been about all morning. She’d been wrong. They weren’t out to get her after all. It was only Rachel.

Diane was nudging her and holding out a card. “Hey, Laura, here’s one for you to wear.”

For a moment Laura stared at the card. She looked from Rachel’s red, frightened face to Diane’s mocking smile, and she heard the pulsing, frenzied rhythm of the claps and the stamping, faster and faster. Her hands trembled as she picked up the card and pinned it to her sweater. And as she turned, she saw Rachel’s stricken look.

“She’s a creep, isn’t she?” Diane’s voice was soft and intimate.

And Laura began to clap.

Copyright by Rona Maynard. Do not reproduce or perform without permission of the author. Click here to read “Paper Flowers,” another story I wrote in my teen years.

 

Posted by Rona



Previously posted comments:

Comment
Jasmine Gales
June 22, 2009 at 2:02PM

This book was very good. It helped me out a lot.

Keep writing books like this.!
thanks for the inspiration

Comment
paola
August 31, 2009 at 1:01PM

this book is really good wish u can writer other books like this!!!…

Comment
gladys
February 11, 2010 at 10:10AM

This was a very interesting book.

Comment
natalie.
June 01, 2010 at 5:05PM

okay., so im in 7th grade
& were doing a projest on this story. my project is to find deatails in the reading that will help me dress Laura, Rachel, & Diane. i cannot find any details on how Laura is dressed. Help me please!? this is due tommorow.

Comment
Kimberly Hartter
July 19, 2010 at 5:05PM

What a powerful story! My gifted 7th graders will be able to connect and have strong responses to such a realistic portrayal of our need to belong, even sacrificing who we think we are. I’d like to use this w/my students as our lit. anthology is lacking. Where can I access this piece of lit. to use for classroom instruction? Kind regards, Kim Hartter

Comment
pj
October 05, 2010 at 4:04PM

this is a very nice story…
im a 7th grader and im having a test on this tomorrow

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 05, 2010 at 4:04 PM

Good luck, PJ. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

Comment
peter
October 05, 2010 at 4:04PM

so, what happens after laura joins the fan club? you should write like a sequel to this story

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 05, 2010 at 5:05 PM

I’m glad to know people are still thinking about my story all these years after I wrote it but am finished with these characters. Let the reader decide what happens to them. Suggestion: ask yourself what you’d do in this situation. Would you protest or join in humiliating the unpopular kid? And then how would you feel about your choice? You know as much as I do, Peter.

Comment
peter
October 06, 2010 at 10:10AM

wow i just read, u wrote this in your teen years???
wow you must have a gift, some people cant write somthing this nice in their later years

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 07, 2010 at 11:11 AM

That’s right; I was 14. I’ve written many things since that please me more than “The Fan Club,” including a memoir that’s particularly close to my heart. But “The Fan Club” seems to have touched more readers than anything else.

Comment
Alex
October 11, 2010 at 12:12PM

Such a wonderful story. We read this story this year in eighth grade. I love the description of the school, “massive and dark against the sky”. I really enjoy reading and hope I can read more material from you.

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 11, 2010 at 3:03 PM

Hi, Alex. I love hearing from young people who care about books, words and stories. If you liked “The Fan Club,” you might also enjoy “Paper Flowers,” another story I wrote as a high school student. You can find it right here on this website: http://www.ronamaynard.com/index.php?paper-flowers

Comment
Vanessa
October 19, 2010 at 5:05PM

This story is really inspiring! We read this story in 7th grade, and it is so good! It contains so many desciptive details and the the way you wrote it is great. I hope i can read more of your stories!

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 19, 2010 at 7:07 PM

Thanks, Vanessa. I didn’t write much fiction but I do have another short story on this website, also written when I was in high school. It’s about the end of a passionate friendship. Here’s the link: http://www.ronamaynard.com/index.php?paper-flowers

Comment
Phoebe Osterc
November 18, 2010 at 6:06AM

This is such a great story! I am a student at Athens State University for English with Secondary Education minor. I was hoping to use this story in my lesson plans for the students to read. Would that be alright with you? I would need to know the date of publication too. Thanks!

Reply
Rona Maynard
January 07, 2011 at 6:06 AM

Glad you enjoyed the story, Phoebe. I’ll respond to your question by e-mail.

Comment
Riley Freeman
December 07, 2010 at 12:12PM

my grade is reading this book in school i really like it ( look at my videos on youtube venom inc )

Comment
abraham
December 09, 2010 at 11:11AM

a very good book. i enjoyed it alot

Comment
Nathan
March 26, 2011 at 4:04PM

I love this story and my teacher is making us do a essay about it and this really helped me. the essay is about the irony and the theme of the story and we have to do an extended reponese

Reply
Rona Maynard
March 31, 2011 at 12:12 PM

Good luck, Nathan!

Comment
Hanna
April 28, 2011 at 5:05PM

My teacher recently showed me this story so I could use it in my “anthology” which is a huge project for the end of the year, and it really touched me. I began to relate to Laura in what she said in her speech. I thought she was different from the others. But sadly enough she changed the way she thought just to “fit in.” It just amazes me what some people will do to be what some call popular. It?s sad but true!!

Reply
Rona Maynard
April 28, 2011 at 6:06 PM

Hanna, I’m glad you recognized your world in this story. That’s the highest compliment any writer can receive.

Comment
Hanna
April 29, 2011 at 2:02PM

But, I have a question. I know that you shouldnt change who you are for someone else. But what more is important to the story. I need some ideas for my anthology.

Comment
krystell
May 14, 2011 at 2:02PM

such a great sorry… i like it is my secnd favorite story that i loved.. i had read allot of storys but this one was great one

Comment
WM
May 15, 2011 at 10:10AM

good story:) iam a 7th grader and i am having a test on this tommorrow! i like it hope u steel writing stories like this

Comment
Jill Fague
August 16, 2011 at 2:02PM

Ms. Maynard,
I just found your story online and I am thinking about using it with my 7th graders. Very thought provoking. May I print copies to share with them? Thank you.

Comment
Roxy
September 05, 2011 at 12:12PM

I liked the story. I don’t think Laura should of joined Diana and them. But it happens! I’m in 7th grade and we are doing a speech.. my task is to do the most important part in the story in my opinion. I think I’m going to do the part where Laura joins Diana and them.

Reply
Rona Maynard
September 05, 2011 at 5:05 PM

Hi, Roxy. You’ve made the right choice. In every story that works, there’s a point at which everything changes. You’ve found that point in “The Fan Club.” Good luck. Oh, by the way. You mean “Laura should HAVE” not “Laura should of.” I just had to point this out.

Comment
Deanna
September 05, 2011 at 6:06PM

Oh my gosh, I love this story! We read it in class last week and we have a speech due tomorrow. Like Roxy I am a 7th grader and we had an assignment that stated we should tell the story from one of the character’s point of view. I chose Diane thinking about class when they held up the cards. This story is so surprising the class was silent. 😛

Reply
Rona Maynard
September 06, 2011 at 10:10 AM

Deanna, I’m honoured that my story made such a deep connection with you. Here’s to a successful speech.

Comment
Joe
September 27, 2011 at 12:12PM

wow i really liked the story.I got a test on it tomorrow. i am in the 7th grade and your story really was one of the best i ever read.I was not really into book until i read yours.

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 04, 2011 at 5:05 AM

Thanks, Joe. Your adventures as a reader are just beginning and I’m proud to have pointed you down the trail.

Comment
Aireonns
October 25, 2011 at 5:05PM

This is a great story. But i am going my mid-term essay about this story. Could you please tell me the theme of it.

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 26, 2011 at 5:05 AM

I’ll let you figure that out for yourself. That’s why you’re in school–to learn.

Comment
LENA
December 06, 2011 at 4:04PM

I really enjoyed reading your story. I have to write an essay on it talking about literary elements you used but i do need some help.So if you can email me it would be great hearing from you.

Reply
Rona Maynard
December 07, 2011 at 4:04 AM

Hi, Lena. Someday a teacher will ask you for an essay on Shakespeare and you won’t be able to ask him for help. Someday you’ll have a problem at work, or with your kids. The answers won’t be obvious. School is supposed to challenge you to think for yourself. The answers you seek are in the story. Keep reading–and thinking–until you find them.

Comment
Salman
January 15, 2012 at 2:02PM

hi ROna, may u tell me y lauras friendship is important to Rachel. I wrote that with Laura being her friend, Rachel has someone else that can share the same feelings

Reply
Rona Maynard
January 28, 2012 at 9:09 AM

Hi, Salman. It’s been a very long time since I wrote “The Fan Club.” As a young person who wants and values friends, you must know a fair bit about the importance of friendship in a kid’s life. It sounds to me as if you’ve made a connection between my fictional kids and your own circle of friends. If you’ve followed your feelings and read the story carefully, I’m sure you came up with a reasonable answer for your teacher.

Comment
diego fernandez
March 01, 2012 at 10:10AM

this story is intersting and i liked reading this story

Reply
Rona Maynard
April 09, 2012 at 5:05 AM

Thanks, Diego. Maybe you’ll write a story of your own someday. And maybe someone will thank you for writing it. How does that sound?

Comment
Mary Kate
March 20, 2012 at 3:03PM

i really liked this story, but i’m having a test on it tomorrow.

PS. This is one of the best stories in my reading book!

Comment
Renee Jegelewicz
September 13, 2012 at 6:06PM

While helping our daughter write commentaries on this story for her literature class in high school, it opened up a great discussion between us with her. It seems as though these “fan clubs” are in every school……and so are the “Rachels.” Thanks for opening an interesting conversation for us!

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 08, 2012 at 6:06 AM

And thank you for sharing your experience, Renee. I feel honoured to have sparked a lively conversation.

Comment
Loane
October 15, 2012 at 1:01PM

Amazing! I was a bit disappointed that Laura joined Dana just for popularity even though Rachel respected her for who she is! I have a test and i was searching for the theme until i found a comment strip. I had to say something about how great this was!

Comment
Tasnia Hussain
October 17, 2012 at 11:11AM

Hi im a 7th grader i really enjoyed this story but i think u should add pictures to it. i But why did Laura take the card, why would she turn against her own friend, i thought she was against discrimination and the crew so why is she joining them?

Reply
Rona Maynard
October 17, 2012 at 12:12 PM

Hi, Tasnia. Great question. And here’s a question for you. Have you ever done something you knew was wrong because you were afraid that if you didn’t, you wouldn’t fit in with the crowd? Can you say you’ve never done that? I couldn’t when I was growing up. That’s why I wrote this story. It’s one thing to say you’re against discrimination and another thing to take a stand.

Comment
Tasnia Hussain
October 21, 2012 at 4:04PM

True! But i feel bad for Rachel. In the story, she’s annoying, boring, but a very sweet girl.
I really admire this story.

Reply
Rona Maynard
November 10, 2012 at 4:04 PM

Glad you enjoyed it, Tasnia.

Comment
knz
January 22, 2013 at 2:02PM

Laura seems a bit hypocritical. I mean, is always saying, “why are they so heartless?” when she is the exact same way! She is just as mean to Rachel as Dianne supposedly is to her! I think the point of this story is that you shouldn’t judge other people, because if we look at ourselves, we’re no better than they are.

Comment
knz
January 22, 2013 at 2:02PM

you know, sometimes I’m like Laura. I think everyone is at times…. even if they don’t realize it.

Comment
knz
January 22, 2013 at 3:03PM

I had to read this for one of my because we’re doing a unit on bullying. I’m glad my teacher had me read it. What’s sad is that as long as there are Rachels in the world, there will always be Fan Clubs and Lauras.

Reply
Rona Maynard
January 23, 2013 at 11:11 AM

Thanks for stopping by, knz. Here’s another thing that’s sad: technology has given bullies an arsenal of weapons for hurting the Rachels of the world. Things were simpler in the 60s, when I wrote this story. I’m guessing that’s when your grandparents were in school.

Comment
knz
February 14, 2013 at 5:05PM

Bullying has become a lot harder to prevent now because it doesnt stop when you go home. Because of technology, bullies can hurt you in what is supposed to be the safest place for you to go: home.

Comment
brianna
April 10, 2013 at 3:03PM

i want to write a story like this.It is very nice .

P.S I GET BULLYED IN SCHOOL LIKE RACHEL!

Reply
Rona Maynard
April 10, 2013 at 4:04 PM

Hi, Brianna. Bullying really hurts, doesn’t it? I know because it happened to me when I was a kid. A wonderful website called Kids Help Phone has lots of information that can help you plus an online forum that will connect you to someone who understands and can give you confidential advice. There’s also an 800 number you can call. Kids Help Phone is Canadian so I don’t know if the number works in the U.S., but most kids seem to prefer the online route anyway. I can’t say enough good things about this site and hope you’ll give it a try. Here’s the link:http://www.kidshelpphone.ca/Teens/InfoBooth/Bullying.aspx Please come back and let us know how you’re doing.

Comment
brittney
April 11, 2013 at 7:07PM

when i read this i wanted to know if the theme is bullying b/c i get bullied alot. people call me names cause im different from them

Reply
Rona Maynard
April 12, 2013 at 10:10 AM

I’m so sorry to hear that, Brittney. Yiu’re not the only one and help is out there. See my advice to Brianna. Kids Help Phone is a wonderful service run by people who know how to listen to kids.

Comment
Felipe
April 12, 2013 at 1:01PM

Hi 🙂 well I found the story fantastic and very inspiring. But, today in my English class we’re writing essays about your story and well I can’t seem to find any good themes for my paper and I was wondering if you can help me with my final copy. Please it would really help me write about your book.

Comment
Alexandra
April 12, 2013 at 6:06PM

I am in love with you’re book! I dislike the fact that Rachel gets bullied because she is different. I use to get bullied a lot because i use to be very small, I still am but not many people say bad things to me anymore. I wish in the story there would be one person who would stand up for Rachel, that would make the ” cool” kids be nicer to Rachel, in my opinion anyway.

Comment
Alexandra
April 12, 2013 at 6:06PM

I am in love with you’re book! I dislike the fact that Rachel gets bullied because she is different. I use to get bullied a lot because i use to be very small, I still am but not many people say bad things to me anymore. I wish in the story there would be one person who would stand up for Rachel, that would make the ” cool” kids be nicer to Rachel, in my opinion anyway.

Comment
Emalie Mitchell
August 16, 2013 at 12:12PM

i get ur book The Fan Club because i get bullied + my friend back stabbed me like Laura did to raichel

Reply
Rona Maynard
August 19, 2013 at 12:12 PM

Hi, Emalie. It hurts, doesn’t it? You trusted your friend and she betrayed you. Try to remember there are other people out there who deserve your trust. They’re the friends you need. For help with bullying, I recommend a great website called Kids Help Phone. They have a live chat forum on bullying. Check it out: http://kidshelpphone.ca/teens/home/splash.aspx

Comment
Emalie Mitchell
August 20, 2013 at 11:11AM

ur my hero Rona.rn:-)

Reply
Rona Maynard
August 31, 2013 at 4:04 PM

What a lovely comment, Emalie. Thanks for the smile.

Comment
Mira
September 05, 2013 at 6:06PM

Hi! How are you? I really liked this story! I thought that Laura would stand up for her friend at the end, but instead I got disappointed in her. That was very horrible of her to be a bully to her friend she had known for so long! I would like to read more of your stories! I think I will read the other one you wrote!

Reply
Rona Maynard
September 05, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Lovely to hear from you, Mira. I’m glad you enjoyed my story and hope the other one appeals as well. Thanks for visiting.

Comment
Mira
September 05, 2013 at 6:06PM

HI again! I am 15 right now, and I wanted to say that I am writing two books currently! I just do not know if I will be able to do a good job like when you wrote it! Hopefully I will!

Reply
Rona Maynard
September 05, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Wonderful, Mira! Good luck. All writers worry about measuring up so you’re in excellent company.

Comment
Camilla
September 24, 2013 at 7:07PM

Hello Rona! Today we were discussing this story in my 7th grade english class, and I just wanted to say I can’t believe you wrote this when you were fourteen! This is remarkable! I think the story was a bit ironic though, because when Laura thought that Diane and her friends where talking or mocking her, she was talking about how mean they are, and how people are discriminated. Rachel was being sweet to her the whole time, and even if she was awkward or annoying. So I think Laura was being hypocritical to join Diane and her friends just to be popular, but I almost don’t blame her. She was under alot of peer pressure by the popular kids, and as sad as it is, some people would do anything to be popular, which I think your story captured wonderfully. Props on writing this when you were 14, amazing! Thank you for opening up so much discussion for my class and I!

Reply
Rona Maynard
September 24, 2013 at 9:09 PM

Camilla, thanks for visiting and sharing your experience with your students. I’m so glad your class enjoyed my story. I certainly never envisioned the impact it would have when I wrote it all those years ago.

Comment
Devon
November 11, 2013 at 6:06PM

At my school we have been talking about this story and let me just say that I loved it. 🙂

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Rona Maynard
November 11, 2013 at 9:09 PM

So glad you enjoyed it, Devon. Thanks for visiting.

Comment
Shaina
December 04, 2013 at 9:09PM

I really like the story. This story is really creative and in my class I am reading and talking about the story. For my Homework I have to write about the story. My literacy teacher told me about the author’s craft and she pulled all the literary elements you use in the story. This was my task but I really like this story I really enjoy it.

Reply
Rona Maynard
January 16, 2014 at 3:03 PM

Hi, Shaina. So glad my story was more than just homework for you. Thanks for taking a minute to let me know.

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lily hume
January 20, 2014 at 3:03PM

this short story is amazing! i wish i could write like you! you should make more of these short stories because we teenagers can relate to them!

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Rona Maynard
January 20, 2014 at 3:03 PM

Good to hear from you, Lily. I’m not writing fiction anymore but you can find another story of mine right here on this site and it too is about teenagers. I was in high school when I wrote it. Here’s the link: http://www.ronamaynard.com/index.php?paper-flowers

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Skyler Lockhart
February 26, 2014 at 9:09AM

Thank you so much for writing a story as inspirational as this one, I myself and a young writer, I am 17 years old, And i have been writing story’s and also books since i could spell.. And as Rachael in the story, I get bullied myself…

Reply
Rona Maynard
March 03, 2014 at 8:08 AM

Thanks for visiting, Skyler. Keep writing! It will give you a focus and keep you grounded no matter what’s going on in your life.

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Sara
October 09, 2014 at 6:06PM

You write really good stories. I’ve also gone to the link for “Paper Flowers” and I think that they’re both awesome. My whole entire class thought this was REALLY good. We just think that the bullying part of this is just… not good in a nice way but good in a “it really shows what this means” type of way. I think this is a great way to reach out to middle school kids and high school kids.

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